Good heavens, I believe it’s a story!

So, I wrote something. Or rather I finished something. Not only finished, but edited, tweaked, re-worked, completed, and posted, a whole short story: Brevity.

Now that’s nothing particularly remarkable in the great and tedious scheme of things, but right now, for me, at this time, it is a big win. And I am feeling rather pleased with myself, thank you very much.

What’s more, you can read it, right here, right now. It is just under 4,500 words, so should take you about 30-40 minutes to read. And for you technology-laden folks, I’ve added a free ebook (ePub format) download.

Unlike most of my work, this is not horror, but speculative fiction verging on sci-fi. It was inspired by the increasing brevity with which we communicate today, and suggests one possible outcome of setting aside the colour and wealth of our language.

If you can grab yourself some time to read it, I do hope you enjoy it, or at the very least that it might trigger you to give some thought to the subject matter. If you do, please take a moment to share the story with your social and real-world friends. Even if you do not enjoy it, others might.

Download for free: epub | kindle (.mobi)
Amazon (£0.99 / $0.99): Kindle US | Kindle UK

4 Comments

  1. anxioussilence
    January 11, 2015
    Reply

    Really enjoyed this. Unrelated to the story, my technology slightly threw me, Kindle insists on telling me how much reading time is left in the story (which I can and should switch off) so the end came as a bit of a surprise due to the licence 🙂

    • Neil Dixon
      January 11, 2015
      Reply

      Glad you enjoyed it, Bob.
      I was concerned about that timing problem, to be honest, and have experienced it myself. I’ll have to dig into the mobi format, see if there’s a way to define the main story block. It may be enough just to state the license and link to the CC site, since in an elbow format you can go straight to the main licence page.

      • anxioussilence
        January 11, 2015
        Reply

        I have not had a look at the format at all but would hope there would be some facility to exclude sections of copy from the timing calculations. Aside from when I’m reading for work purposes I really dislike the estimated timings, I find myself concentrating more on my reading speed than the writing itself.

        • Neil Dixon
          January 11, 2015
          Reply

          I tend to fixate on that, too. On the kobo, it tells you roughly how long it will take to get to a chapters end, which does help to decide whether to break off or push for a few more pages. It takes a couple of clicks to get to, which avoids checking too often.

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